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Kids flower art activity

 
Kids will have fun making their own garden fairies, especially over summer when plants are in full bloom. Teach them the names of the flowers that you use, discuss the different shades of colour and how plants grow.
Kids will have fun doing this outdoor flower art activity, especially over summer when plants and flowers are in full bloom.

Use it as a learning activity too, teaching them the names of the flowers that you use, discuss the different shades of colour and how plants grow.
 

Kids flower art activity

 

What you will need for your kids flower art activity:

 
  • Flowers and flower petals, leaves and ferns from the garden
  • 1 piece of plain paper & a pencil
  • PVA glue
  • Cover seal
 

How to make your own flower art


1. Go on an outdoor adventure to collect flowers, petals leaves and ferns in the garden.

2. Get your child to draw a person with a face, legs and arms on the paper.

3. Fill in the gaps with all the different kinds of flowers, petals, leaves and ferns they've found, gluing them onto the paper.

4. Once the glue has dried, apply the cover seal to preserve their flower artwork.

More kids activities articles to enjoy:
Source: This article has been written by Creators, a nationwide service offering quality home-based care and education. Creators are passionate about seeing every child’s unique talent being recognized and nurtured.
Image source: Pinterest
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