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Toilet training tips for toddlers

 
Everyone's different, but children are usually ready to start toilet training somewhere between 18 months - 3.5 years on average. We take a look at some of the cues for toilet training readiness, managing poo issues and moving through each phase of the toilet training process at your toddler's pace.

Everyone's different, but children are usually ready to start toilet training somewhere between 18 months - 3.5 years on average.

We take a look at some of the cues for toilet training readiness, managing poo issues and moving through each phase of the toilet training process at your toddler's pace.
 

3 Toilet training tips for toddlers

 

1. Toilet training readiness 

Cues that your toddler is ready to start toilet training includes the ability to have a dry nappy for a few hours over nap time, enough language to tell you before or after the event and enough dexterity to be able to get their pants down by themselves.
  
When you start toilet training your toddler, using undies instead of pull-ups is helpful for allowing them to feel when they are wet/dirty. However you might still need to use a pull up for swimming lessons, dance classes etc in the initial stages.

Keep the tone positive. If you're getting frustrated or there are more accidents than successes, take a break from toilet training for a few weeks and then try again.

It can take time for your toddler's psychological and physiological readiness to match. When it does, the toilet training process will go smoothly.
 

2. Things to try when you're toilet training your toddler

When it comes to toilet training toddlers, it often comes down to trial and error and what works best for your child.

Here are some tips you might like to try:

  • Encourage your toddler to help with the clean-up of any mess and to get themselves a new pair of undies.
 
  • Toddlers are most likely to do a poo/wee 30-60 minutes after eating, so try to ensure they are taken to the toilet at these times.
 
  • If your toddler is engaged in play they are likely to override any sensations to go, so taking them to the toilet each hour is useful. 
 
  • Star/reward charts can be useful for some toddlers. Each time they get a result they get to choose one or two stickers for instance immediately after they have washed their hands.
   
  • Role modelling and normalising toilet behaviour at home helps to bring it into your toddler’s consciousness. An ‘open door policy’ when you go to the toilet so they can see works wonders, let them flush the toilet for you. Toddlers want to do what we do!
 
  • Before you go out, take your toddler to the toilet, when you arrive at your destination take them to the toilet to get them into the habit of going.
 

3. Managing your toddler's poo issues during toilet training

Some toddlers have problems with their bowel motions, so if this proves to be the case for your little one, try giving this process a go:

Phase 1 - give permission for your toddler to do a poo in their nappy
 
Phase 2 - encourage your toddler to poo in their nappy in the bathroom/where the toilet is
 
Phase 3 - encourage your toddler to sit on the toilet seat in their nappy
 
Phase 4 - cut a large hole in your toddler's nappy and them to sit on the toilet to poo
 
Phase 5 - remove your toddler's nappy and get them to poo in the toilet ..... SUCCESS!!
 
Move through each phase at your toddler's pace.
 
You may need to cycle through the process a number of times before your toddler is reliably toilet trained, or it may happen quickly. As long as you are both happy with how the process is going, keep doing what you're doing.
 
Take a break whenever you are having a bad run and revisit. It'll all happen when they are ready.

More kids toilet training articles to enjoy:


Source: This article was written by Baby & Beyond – post natal and sleep consultants.
Image source: parents.com
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