Shop
01663

Nurturing resilience in young children

 
In nurturing resilience in our children, it’s important to find a balance between the ‘bubble wrapping’ practices of a ‘helicopter’, over-protective and controlling parent on the one hand, and the laissez faire, under-supervised parenting practices on the other.
In nurturing resilience in our children, it’s important to find a balance between the ‘bubble wrapping’ practices of a ‘helicopter’, over-protective and controlling parent on the one hand, and the laissez faire, under-supervised parenting practices on the other.

Children have a deep-rooted psychological need for risk taking and responsibility seeking that underlies the maturing process.

It’s often felt that children who push the limits (and scare us adults in the process) may also be those who are the ones most ready for life.

We explore how to keep our children out of harm’s way while still offering them what they need to experience the thrills that are part of growing up.

While, as parents, we delude ourselves into thinking we’re the ones doing the ‘bringing up’, we have to admit we don’t always know best.

Parenting is not an exact science and families are too diverse for there ever to be one recipe for success.

What works for one child could be disastrous for another. Ignore the experts and trust yourself first.

The road to success lies in our own self-knowledge, flexibility and the courage to really listen to and understand our children in order to encourage the self-expression needed to help them find their talent, passion and uniqueness. Often this means suspending our expectations and allowing our children to lead.

Children will do whatever they need to do to convince themselves of the three ‘C’s - competent, capable contributors to their communities.

Often whatever a well-intentioned adult says to a child will be helpful, but sometimes our own fears and limitations get in the way of enabling our children to find ways of being powerful.

Our children need the same kind of challenges we had as kids. But they also need the support of caring adults who can help them cope. Our children are begging us for opportunities to prove themselves.

We should all listen to our children and communicate in ways that they can understand what we mean.

Through engaging in respectful conversations and meaningful experiences with our children, our role as parents is to coach them to take safe risks and develop responsibility, because that will facilitate their transition to adulthood and understanding of four powerful messages – that they belong, are trustworthy, responsible and capable – the core to developing resilience.

Check out our other Hot Topics on:
Article source: Jumping Beans - Fun, child-centered, physical activity and movement to music classes for babies and pre-schoolers ages 6 weeks to 6 years.
Enquire

You might also be interested in ...

Basic cooking skills for young kids

Basic cooking skills for young kids

Teach your kids some basic cooking and baking skills, and with a little patience, you could soon have your very own budding Master Chef in the family! Kids love to help out in the kitchen and being able to cook is a great skill for anyone to have.
10 Tips to help reduce toddler tantrums

10 Tips to help reduce toddler tantrums

Check out these tips on how to help reduce your little one’s tantrums which often occur between the ages of 18 months and 3 years old, with meltdowns of screaming, crying, kicking, biting and hitting as they try to express their emotions.

join us

Join us on social media for all our latest news.
facebook twitter pinterest
 

sign up

Sign up and receive our latest newsletters.
First/Last Name
Email
Town/City
 

contact us

mailinfo@under5s.co.nz
phone09 376 4408
PO Box 147429
Ponsonby
Auckland 1144

advertise with us