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Choosing great read aloud books

 
So how do you choose a great read aloud book when there are so many good children’s books out there? Books that will become firm family favourites and hold your children’s interest time and time again. Check out these 4 tips to help you find read aloud books that your baby, toddler or pre-schooler will love.
So how do you choose a great read aloud book when there are so many good children’s books out there?
 
Books that will become firm family favourites and hold your children’s interest time and time again.
 
Check out these 4 tips to help you find read aloud books that your baby, toddler or pre-schooler will love.
 

Choosing great read aloud books

 

1.  Choose books which contain rhythm and rhyme

 
  • Stories with rhythm and rhyme help support children’s language development. They’re usually fun to listen to, easy to read and the words flow off your tongue. 
 
  • Good examples include The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson and The Rattletrap Car by Phyllis Root.
 

2. Choose books with bright bold illustrations

 
  • As a rule of thumb, choose bigger, brighter and more colourful books for small children, gradually moving to more detailed illustrations for older children.
 
  • As an example, Where’s Spot? by Eric Hill is great for younger children, whilst Uno’s Garden by Graeme Base has excellent detailed illustrations for older children.
 

3. Choose interactive books

 
  • Choose books which encourage your little one to interact and be involved whilst you read to them.
 
  • Books that ask them to find certain characters on the page or something hidden under a flap, or if they’re a little older perhaps choose books that ask them to count or recognise letters of the alphabet.
 
  • Examples include The Game of Finger Worms and The Game of Light, both by Herve Tullet, and You Choose by Nick Sharratt.
 

4. Choose books with interesting vocabulary

 
  • Books open up a whole new world of vocabulary for children to learn and understand. Try to find books with interesting topics and vocabulary they might not use every day.
 
  • As an example, why not read The Ravenous Beast by Niamh Sharkey
 

Have fun reading


Once you’ve chosen your books, aim to read 3 books a day to your little one – one of their favourites, one familiar and one entirely new.
 
Make reading time a special time and perhaps introduce a big comfy reading chair or another relaxing spot in the house where you always sit and read together.
 
You could also set up a reading routine, reading with your little one at the same time every day.

More articles for you to enjoy  
Source: This article was written by Wendy Perera at Teeny Tiny - Supporting Literacy and Numeracy in the home for 2-5 years.
Image source: telegraph
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