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Toileting Tips

 
Everyone's different, but children are usually ready to start toilet training somewhere between 18 months - 3 1/2 years on average. We take a look at some of the cues for toileting readiness, managing poo issues and moving through each phase at your child's pace.

Everyone's different, but children are usually ready to start toilet training somewhere between 18 months - 3 1/2 years on average.

We take a look at some of the cues for toileting readiness, managing poo issues and moving through each phase at your child's pace.


3 Toilet Tips

 

1. Toileting readiness

Cues for toileting readiness include:

Ability to have a dry nappy for a few hours over nap time, enough language to tell you before or after the event and enough dexterity to be able to get their pants down.
  
Using undies instead of pull-ups is helpful for allowing your child to feel when they are wet/dirty, a pull up for gym class or dance class etc is a sensible idea.

Keep the tone positive. If you're getting frustrated or there are more accidents than successes, take a break from the process for a few weeks and then retry. 

It can take time for the psychological and physiological readiness to match. When it does, the process will go smoothly.
 

2. Things to try

When it comes to toilet training, it often comes down to trial and error and what works best for your child. Here are some tips you might like to try:

Encourage your child to help with the clean-up of any mess and to get themselves a new pair of undies.
 
Children are most likely to do a poo/wee 30-60 minutes after eating so ensure they are taken to the toilet at these times. 
 
If your child is engaged in play they are likely to override any sensations to go, so taking them to the toilet each hour is useful. 
 
Star/reward charts can be useful for some small people. Or a small treat, have a jar of lollies or stickers and put it up high so they can see it but they can't get it, each time they get a result they get to choose one or two immediately after they have washed their hands. 
   
Role modelling and normalising toilet behaviour at home helps to bring it into your child’s consciousness, an ‘open door policy’ when you go to the toilet so they can see works wonders, let them flush the toilet for you. Our little people want to do what we do! 
 
Before you go out, take them to the toilet, when you arrive at your destination take them to the toilet. 
 

3. Managing poo issues

Some little ones have problems with their bowel motions, so if this proves to be the case for your little one, try giving this process a go:

Phase 1 - give permission for your child to do a poo in their nappy
 
Phase 2 - encourage your child to poo in their nappy in the bathroom/where the toilet is
 
Phase 3 - encourage your child to sit on the toilet seat in their nappy
 
Phase 4 - cut a large hole in your child's nappy and get your child to sit on the toilet to poo
 
Phase 5 - remove your child's nappy and get them to poo in the toilet ..... SUCCESS!!
 
Move through each phase at your child's pace.
 
You may need to cycle through the process a number of times before your child is reliably toilet trained, or it may happen quickly. As long as you are both happy with how the process is, keep on going.
 
Take a break whenever you are having a bad run and revisit. It'll all happen when they are ready.

 

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Source: This article was written by Baby & Beyond – post natal and sleep consultants.
Image source: reflux.org.au
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